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Public invited to Ice Cream Freeze-Off to help feed local schoolchildren

Clarksville Now

CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. (CLARKSVILLENOW) – The United Methodist Churches of Mt. Zion, Antioch, Marion and Salem along with the Lone Oak and Memorial Baptist churches will host the eighth annual I Scream for FUEL, Ice Cream Freeze-Off on Saturday, Aug. 25.

The event raises much-needed funds to support the FUEL program that provides non-perishable, easy to prepare food items for young children in Clarksville-Montgomery County Schools. Many children rely on school breakfast and lunch for their primary meals each day. The food items supplied help to supplement them over the weekend.

Those interested in attending the event can visit Mt. Zion Methodist Church, 5875 Highway 48, Cunningham TN from 4 – 6 p.m. on Saturday, August 25 for hot dogs and some ice cream sampling. Donations at the door for FUEL would be greatly appreciated.

For more information about the FUEL program, visit the organization’s website.

Clarksville NowMembers of the Visit Clarksville Board of Directors and staff visited the Pat Head Summitt Legacy Park and Statue, RichEllen Park and Historic Collinsville. L-R: Karyl Kirkland, Bill Powers, Louisa Cooke, Frances Manzitto, Matt Cunningham, Kyle Luther, Theresa Harrington, Jerry Allbert. (Photo: Visit Clarksville)
L-R: Karyl Kirkland, Frances Manzitto, Louisa Cooke, Jerry Allbert, Matt Cunningham, Theresa Harrington, Kyle Luther. (Photo: Visit Clarksville)
Clarksville Now

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Public invited to Ice Cream Freeze-Off to help feed local schoolchildren

Clarksville Now

CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. (CLARKSVILLENOW) – The United Methodist Churches of Mt. Zion, Antioch, Marion and Salem along with the Lone Oak and Memorial Baptist churches will host the eighth annual I Scream for FUEL, Ice Cream Freeze-Off on Saturday, Aug. 25.

The event raises much-needed funds to support the FUEL program that provides non-perishable, easy to prepare food items for young children in Clarksville-Montgomery County Schools. Many children rely on school breakfast and lunch for their primary meals each day. The food items supplied help to supplement them over the weekend.

Those interested in attending the event can visit Mt. Zion Methodist Church, 5875 Highway 48, Cunningham TN from 4 – 6 p.m. on Saturday, August 25 for hot dogs and some ice cream sampling. Donations at the door for FUEL would be greatly appreciated.

For more information about the FUEL program, visit the organization’s website.

Clarksville NowMembers of the Visit Clarksville Board of Directors and staff visited the Pat Head Summitt Legacy Park and Statue, RichEllen Park and Historic Collinsville. L-R: Karyl Kirkland, Bill Powers, Louisa Cooke, Frances Manzitto, Matt Cunningham, Kyle Luther, Theresa Harrington, Jerry Allbert. (Photo: Visit Clarksville)
L-R: Karyl Kirkland, Frances Manzitto, Louisa Cooke, Jerry Allbert, Matt Cunningham, Theresa Harrington, Kyle Luther. (Photo: Visit Clarksville)

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Woman Nearly Loses Home After Mortgage Company Mix-Up

NASHVILLE, Tn. – If you’re like a lot of people, you pay your property taxes through your monthly mortgage payment. But a woman who trusted her mortgage company to pay her taxes very nearly lost her house.

That company is one of the biggest mortgage providers in Nashville, but it turns out, they didn’t do what they were supposed to.

For the last two years, Carla Rubeo has called a condo in Antioch her home. But she very nearly lost it through no fault of her own.

"And I want people to know that yes, this can happen to anybody," Rubeo told NewsChannel 5 Investigates.

Rubeo said it all started earlier this year when she got a letter from the Davidson County Trustee’s Office, informing her that her 2016 property taxes hadn’t been paid.

"I thought it was a hoax," she recalled.

After all, she’d paid some each month as part of her mortgage and her mortgage company, SWBC, was paying the tax bill at the end of each year.

Or so she thought.

"So you called your mortgage company and they told you they’d paid your taxes?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Rubeo.

"Correct," she replied.

"So you thought everything was okay?" we asked.

"Yes," she said.

But it wasn’t according to the Trustee’s office.

"They told me they haven’t been paid and that there’s no record of them being paid by the mortgage company," Rubeo explained.

SWBC hadn’t paid her 2016 property taxes or her 2017 taxes either.

And then there was this bombshell. Rubeo got a call from a realtor who said he had clients who wanted to buy her house. She told him it wasn’t for sale. And that’s when she learned her home was about to be sold at the Metro Courthouse in one of those public auctions to to pay off what she owed.

And just days later, it was sold to the highest bidder.

"And there was no way for you to stop it?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Rubeo.

"They told me it was too late," she replied.

"And you did everything you were supposed to do and still you lost your house?" we continued.

"Correct," she said.

We talked with Charlie Cardwell, Metro’s longtime Trustee. His office collects the property taxes for Davidson County.

"Did it have to get to this point?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked him.

"It should not have," Cardwell answered.

Cardwell said SWBC sent the wrong account information with Rubeo’s tax payment in both 2016 and again the following year.

"So we automatically send it back to them and say, ‘Well, this must be the wrong account because this account has already been paid,’" Cardwell explained.

"So the mortgage company then, you would think, would investigate and try to figure out which account it belonged to?" we asked him.

"You would think," he said.

But Cardwell says there’s no indication SWBC ever did.

The company turned down repeated requests for an interview, but claimed in a phone call to Rubeo that they had no idea they’d sent the wrong account information or that her house was going to be sold.

But NewsChannel 5 Investigates obtained documents that show the Trustee’s office repeatedly notified SWBC about their error and a letter from the Metro Legal Department warned there was a lien on the property for unpaid taxes and it was about to be sold.

"It sounds like SWBC dropped the ball?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates said to Cardwell.

"Definitely!" he emphatically replied.

Rubeo fortunately is still in her home. After we contacted SWBC and started asking questions, the company finally stepped up and paid the back taxes, plus several thousand dollars more in court costs, penalties and interest to save the house just before the sale was finalized, much to Rubeo’s relief!

"I could have lost everything. Where would we have gone?" Rubeo wondered.

Charlie Cardwell told NewsChannel 5 Investigates he doesn’t want this happening to anyone else so from now on, any time someone’s property taxes are not paid on time, his office will contact the mortgage company immediately to find out if there’s been a mix-up and work to get it fixed.

Copyright 2017 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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Woman Nearly Loses Home After Mortgage Company Mix-Up

NASHVILLE, Tn. – If you’re like a lot of people, you pay your property taxes through your monthly mortgage payment. But a woman who trusted her mortgage company to pay her taxes very nearly lost her house.

That company is one of the biggest mortgage providers in Nashville, but it turns out, they didn’t do what they were supposed to.

For the last two years, Carla Rubeo has called a condo in Antioch her home. But she very nearly lost it through no fault of her own.

"And I want people to know that yes, this can happen to anybody," Rubeo told NewsChannel 5 Investigates.

Rubeo said it all started earlier this year when she got a letter from the Davidson County Trustee’s Office, informing her that her 2016 property taxes hadn’t been paid.

"I thought it was a hoax," she recalled.

After all, she’d paid some each month as part of her mortgage and her mortgage company, SWBC, was paying the tax bill at the end of each year.

Or so she thought.

"So you called your mortgage company and they told you they’d paid your taxes?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Rubeo.

"Correct," she replied.

"So you thought everything was okay?" we asked.

"Yes," she said.

But it wasn’t according to the Trustee’s office.

"They told me they haven’t been paid and that there’s no record of them being paid by the mortgage company," Rubeo explained.

SWBC hadn’t paid her 2016 property taxes or her 2017 taxes either.

And then there was this bombshell. Rubeo got a call from a realtor who said he had clients who wanted to buy her house. She told him it wasn’t for sale. And that’s when she learned her home was about to be sold at the Metro Courthouse in one of those public auctions to to pay off what she owed.

And just days later, it was sold to the highest bidder.

"And there was no way for you to stop it?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Rubeo.

"They told me it was too late," she replied.

"And you did everything you were supposed to do and still you lost your house?" we continued.

"Correct," she said.

We talked with Charlie Cardwell, Metro’s longtime Trustee. His office collects the property taxes for Davidson County.

"Did it have to get to this point?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked him.

"It should not have," Cardwell answered.

Cardwell said SWBC sent the wrong account information with Rubeo’s tax payment in both 2016 and again the following year.

"So we automatically send it back to them and say, ‘Well, this must be the wrong account because this account has already been paid,’" Cardwell explained.

"So the mortgage company then, you would think, would investigate and try to figure out which account it belonged to?" we asked him.

"You would think," he said.

But Cardwell says there’s no indication SWBC ever did.

The company turned down repeated requests for an interview, but claimed in a phone call to Rubeo that they had no idea they’d sent the wrong account information or that her house was going to be sold.

But NewsChannel 5 Investigates obtained documents that show the Trustee’s office repeatedly notified SWBC about their error and a letter from the Metro Legal Department warned there was a lien on the property for unpaid taxes and it was about to be sold.

"It sounds like SWBC dropped the ball?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates said to Cardwell.

"Definitely!" he emphatically replied.

Rubeo fortunately is still in her home. After we contacted SWBC and started asking questions, the company finally stepped up and paid the back taxes, plus several thousand dollars more in court costs, penalties and interest to save the house just before the sale was finalized, much to Rubeo’s relief!

"I could have lost everything. Where would we have gone?" Rubeo wondered.

Charlie Cardwell told NewsChannel 5 Investigates he doesn’t want this happening to anyone else so from now on, any time someone’s property taxes are not paid on time, his office will contact the mortgage company immediately to find out if there’s been a mix-up and work to get it fixed.

Copyright 2017 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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Woman Nearly Loses Home After Mortgage Company Mix-Up

NASHVILLE, Tn. – If you’re like a lot of people, you pay your property taxes through your monthly mortgage payment. But a woman who trusted her mortgage company to pay her taxes very nearly lost her house.

That company is one of the biggest mortgage providers in Nashville, but it turns out, they didn’t do what they were supposed to.

For the last two years, Carla Rubeo has called a condo in Antioch her home. But she very nearly lost it through no fault of her own.

"And I want people to know that yes, this can happen to anybody," Rubeo told NewsChannel 5 Investigates.

Rubeo said it all started earlier this year when she got a letter from the Davidson County Trustee’s Office, informing her that her 2016 property taxes hadn’t been paid.

"I thought it was a hoax," she recalled.

After all, she’d paid some each month as part of her mortgage and her mortgage company, SWBC, was paying the tax bill at the end of each year.

Or so she thought.

"So you called your mortgage company and they told you they’d paid your taxes?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Rubeo.

"Correct," she replied.

"So you thought everything was okay?" we asked.

"Yes," she said.

But it wasn’t according to the Trustee’s office.

"They told me they haven’t been paid and that there’s no record of them being paid by the mortgage company," Rubeo explained.

SWBC hadn’t paid her 2016 property taxes or her 2017 taxes either.

And then there was this bombshell. Rubeo got a call from a realtor who said he had clients who wanted to buy her house. She told him it wasn’t for sale. And that’s when she learned her home was about to be sold at the Metro Courthouse in one of those public auctions to to pay off what she owed.

And just days later, it was sold to the highest bidder.

"And there was no way for you to stop it?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Rubeo.

"They told me it was too late," she replied.

"And you did everything you were supposed to do and still you lost your house?" we continued.

"Correct," she said.

We talked with Charlie Cardwell, Metro’s longtime Trustee. His office collects the property taxes for Davidson County.

"Did it have to get to this point?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked him.

"It should not have," Cardwell answered.

Cardwell said SWBC sent the wrong account information with Rubeo’s tax payment in both 2016 and again the following year.

"So we automatically send it back to them and say, ‘Well, this must be the wrong account because this account has already been paid,’" Cardwell explained.

"So the mortgage company then, you would think, would investigate and try to figure out which account it belonged to?" we asked him.

"You would think," he said.

But Cardwell says there’s no indication SWBC ever did.

The company turned down repeated requests for an interview, but claimed in a phone call to Rubeo that they had no idea they’d sent the wrong account information or that her house was going to be sold.

But NewsChannel 5 Investigates obtained documents that show the Trustee’s office repeatedly notified SWBC about their error and a letter from the Metro Legal Department warned there was a lien on the property for unpaid taxes and it was about to be sold.

"It sounds like SWBC dropped the ball?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates said to Cardwell.

"Definitely!" he emphatically replied.

Rubeo fortunately is still in her home. After we contacted SWBC and started asking questions, the company finally stepped up and paid the back taxes, plus several thousand dollars more in court costs, penalties and interest to save the house just before the sale was finalized, much to Rubeo’s relief!

"I could have lost everything. Where would we have gone?" Rubeo wondered.

Charlie Cardwell told NewsChannel 5 Investigates he doesn’t want this happening to anyone else so from now on, any time someone’s property taxes are not paid on time, his office will contact the mortgage company immediately to find out if there’s been a mix-up and work to get it fixed.

Copyright 2017 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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Woman Nearly Loses Home After Mortgage Company Mix-Up

NASHVILLE, Tn. – If you’re like a lot of people, you pay your property taxes through your monthly mortgage payment. But a woman who trusted her mortgage company to pay her taxes very nearly lost her house.

That company is one of the biggest mortgage providers in Nashville, but it turns out, they didn’t do what they were supposed to.

For the last two years, Carla Rubeo has called a condo in Antioch her home. But she very nearly lost it through no fault of her own.

"And I want people to know that yes, this can happen to anybody," Rubeo told NewsChannel 5 Investigates.

Rubeo said it all started earlier this year when she got a letter from the Davidson County Trustee’s Office, informing her that her 2016 property taxes hadn’t been paid.

"I thought it was a hoax," she recalled.

After all, she’d paid some each month as part of her mortgage and her mortgage company, SWBC, was paying the tax bill at the end of each year.

Or so she thought.

"So you called your mortgage company and they told you they’d paid your taxes?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Rubeo.

"Correct," she replied.

"So you thought everything was okay?" we asked.

"Yes," she said.

But it wasn’t according to the Trustee’s office.

"They told me they haven’t been paid and that there’s no record of them being paid by the mortgage company," Rubeo explained.

SWBC hadn’t paid her 2016 property taxes or her 2017 taxes either.

And then there was this bombshell. Rubeo got a call from a realtor who said he had clients who wanted to buy her house. She told him it wasn’t for sale. And that’s when she learned her home was about to be sold at the Metro Courthouse in one of those public auctions to to pay off what she owed.

And just days later, it was sold to the highest bidder.

"And there was no way for you to stop it?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Rubeo.

"They told me it was too late," she replied.

"And you did everything you were supposed to do and still you lost your house?" we continued.

"Correct," she said.

We talked with Charlie Cardwell, Metro’s longtime Trustee. His office collects the property taxes for Davidson County.

"Did it have to get to this point?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked him.

"It should not have," Cardwell answered.

Cardwell said SWBC sent the wrong account information with Rubeo’s tax payment in both 2016 and again the following year.

"So we automatically send it back to them and say, ‘Well, this must be the wrong account because this account has already been paid,’" Cardwell explained.

"So the mortgage company then, you would think, would investigate and try to figure out which account it belonged to?" we asked him.

"You would think," he said.

But Cardwell says there’s no indication SWBC ever did.

The company turned down repeated requests for an interview, but claimed in a phone call to Rubeo that they had no idea they’d sent the wrong account information or that her house was going to be sold.

But NewsChannel 5 Investigates obtained documents that show the Trustee’s office repeatedly notified SWBC about their error and a letter from the Metro Legal Department warned there was a lien on the property for unpaid taxes and it was about to be sold.

"It sounds like SWBC dropped the ball?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates said to Cardwell.

"Definitely!" he emphatically replied.

Rubeo fortunately is still in her home. After we contacted SWBC and started asking questions, the company finally stepped up and paid the back taxes, plus several thousand dollars more in court costs, penalties and interest to save the house just before the sale was finalized, much to Rubeo’s relief!

"I could have lost everything. Where would we have gone?" Rubeo wondered.

Charlie Cardwell told NewsChannel 5 Investigates he doesn’t want this happening to anyone else so from now on, any time someone’s property taxes are not paid on time, his office will contact the mortgage company immediately to find out if there’s been a mix-up and work to get it fixed.

Copyright 2017 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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Woman Nearly Loses Home After Mortgage Company Mix-Up

NASHVILLE, Tn. – If you’re like a lot of people, you pay your property taxes through your monthly mortgage payment. But a woman who trusted her mortgage company to pay her taxes very nearly lost her house.

That company is one of the biggest mortgage providers in Nashville, but it turns out, they didn’t do what they were supposed to.

For the last two years, Carla Rubeo has called a condo in Antioch her home. But she very nearly lost it through no fault of her own.

"And I want people to know that yes, this can happen to anybody," Rubeo told NewsChannel 5 Investigates.

Rubeo said it all started earlier this year when she got a letter from the Davidson County Trustee’s Office, informing her that her 2016 property taxes hadn’t been paid.

"I thought it was a hoax," she recalled.

After all, she’d paid some each month as part of her mortgage and her mortgage company, SWBC, was paying the tax bill at the end of each year.

Or so she thought.

"So you called your mortgage company and they told you they’d paid your taxes?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Rubeo.

"Correct," she replied.

"So you thought everything was okay?" we asked.

"Yes," she said.

But it wasn’t according to the Trustee’s office.

"They told me they haven’t been paid and that there’s no record of them being paid by the mortgage company," Rubeo explained.

SWBC hadn’t paid her 2016 property taxes or her 2017 taxes either.

And then there was this bombshell. Rubeo got a call from a realtor who said he had clients who wanted to buy her house. She told him it wasn’t for sale. And that’s when she learned her home was about to be sold at the Metro Courthouse in one of those public auctions to to pay off what she owed.

And just days later, it was sold to the highest bidder.

"And there was no way for you to stop it?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Rubeo.

"They told me it was too late," she replied.

"And you did everything you were supposed to do and still you lost your house?" we continued.

"Correct," she said.

We talked with Charlie Cardwell, Metro’s longtime Trustee. His office collects the property taxes for Davidson County.

"Did it have to get to this point?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked him.

"It should not have," Cardwell answered.

Cardwell said SWBC sent the wrong account information with Rubeo’s tax payment in both 2016 and again the following year.

"So we automatically send it back to them and say, ‘Well, this must be the wrong account because this account has already been paid,’" Cardwell explained.

"So the mortgage company then, you would think, would investigate and try to figure out which account it belonged to?" we asked him.

"You would think," he said.

But Cardwell says there’s no indication SWBC ever did.

The company turned down repeated requests for an interview, but claimed in a phone call to Rubeo that they had no idea they’d sent the wrong account information or that her house was going to be sold.

But NewsChannel 5 Investigates obtained documents that show the Trustee’s office repeatedly notified SWBC about their error and a letter from the Metro Legal Department warned there was a lien on the property for unpaid taxes and it was about to be sold.

"It sounds like SWBC dropped the ball?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates said to Cardwell.

"Definitely!" he emphatically replied.

Rubeo fortunately is still in her home. After we contacted SWBC and started asking questions, the company finally stepped up and paid the back taxes, plus several thousand dollars more in court costs, penalties and interest to save the house just before the sale was finalized, much to Rubeo’s relief!

"I could have lost everything. Where would we have gone?" Rubeo wondered.

Charlie Cardwell told NewsChannel 5 Investigates he doesn’t want this happening to anyone else so from now on, any time someone’s property taxes are not paid on time, his office will contact the mortgage company immediately to find out if there’s been a mix-up and work to get it fixed.

Copyright 2017 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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Woman Nearly Loses Home After Mortgage Company Mix-Up

NASHVILLE, Tn. – If you’re like a lot of people, you pay your property taxes through your monthly mortgage payment. But a woman who trusted her mortgage company to pay her taxes very nearly lost her house.

That company is one of the biggest mortgage providers in Nashville, but it turns out, they didn’t do what they were supposed to.

For the last two years, Carla Rubeo has called a condo in Antioch her home. But she very nearly lost it through no fault of her own.

"And I want people to know that yes, this can happen to anybody," Rubeo told NewsChannel 5 Investigates.

Rubeo said it all started earlier this year when she got a letter from the Davidson County Trustee’s Office, informing her that her 2016 property taxes hadn’t been paid.

"I thought it was a hoax," she recalled.

After all, she’d paid some each month as part of her mortgage and her mortgage company, SWBC, was paying the tax bill at the end of each year.

Or so she thought.

"So you called your mortgage company and they told you they’d paid your taxes?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Rubeo.

"Correct," she replied.

"So you thought everything was okay?" we asked.

"Yes," she said.

But it wasn’t according to the Trustee’s office.

"They told me they haven’t been paid and that there’s no record of them being paid by the mortgage company," Rubeo explained.

SWBC hadn’t paid her 2016 property taxes or her 2017 taxes either.

And then there was this bombshell. Rubeo got a call from a realtor who said he had clients who wanted to buy her house. She told him it wasn’t for sale. And that’s when she learned her home was about to be sold at the Metro Courthouse in one of those public auctions to to pay off what she owed.

And just days later, it was sold to the highest bidder.

"And there was no way for you to stop it?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Rubeo.

"They told me it was too late," she replied.

"And you did everything you were supposed to do and still you lost your house?" we continued.

"Correct," she said.

We talked with Charlie Cardwell, Metro’s longtime Trustee. His office collects the property taxes for Davidson County.

"Did it have to get to this point?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked him.

"It should not have," Cardwell answered.

Cardwell said SWBC sent the wrong account information with Rubeo’s tax payment in both 2016 and again the following year.

"So we automatically send it back to them and say, ‘Well, this must be the wrong account because this account has already been paid,’" Cardwell explained.

"So the mortgage company then, you would think, would investigate and try to figure out which account it belonged to?" we asked him.

"You would think," he said.

But Cardwell says there’s no indication SWBC ever did.

The company turned down repeated requests for an interview, but claimed in a phone call to Rubeo that they had no idea they’d sent the wrong account information or that her house was going to be sold.

But NewsChannel 5 Investigates obtained documents that show the Trustee’s office repeatedly notified SWBC about their error and a letter from the Metro Legal Department warned there was a lien on the property for unpaid taxes and it was about to be sold.

"It sounds like SWBC dropped the ball?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates said to Cardwell.

"Definitely!" he emphatically replied.

Rubeo fortunately is still in her home. After we contacted SWBC and started asking questions, the company finally stepped up and paid the back taxes, plus several thousand dollars more in court costs, penalties and interest to save the house just before the sale was finalized, much to Rubeo’s relief!

"I could have lost everything. Where would we have gone?" Rubeo wondered.

Charlie Cardwell told NewsChannel 5 Investigates he doesn’t want this happening to anyone else so from now on, any time someone’s property taxes are not paid on time, his office will contact the mortgage company immediately to find out if there’s been a mix-up and work to get it fixed.

Copyright 2017 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Print this article Back to Top

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Woman Nearly Loses Home After Mortgage Company Mix-Up

NASHVILLE, Tn. – If you’re like a lot of people, you pay your property taxes through your monthly mortgage payment. But a woman who trusted her mortgage company to pay her taxes very nearly lost her house.

That company is one of the biggest mortgage providers in Nashville, but it turns out, they didn’t do what they were supposed to.

For the last two years, Carla Rubeo has called a condo in Antioch her home. But she very nearly lost it through no fault of her own.

"And I want people to know that yes, this can happen to anybody," Rubeo told NewsChannel 5 Investigates.

Rubeo said it all started earlier this year when she got a letter from the Davidson County Trustee’s Office, informing her that her 2016 property taxes hadn’t been paid.

"I thought it was a hoax," she recalled.

After all, she’d paid some each month as part of her mortgage and her mortgage company, SWBC, was paying the tax bill at the end of each year.

Or so she thought.

"So you called your mortgage company and they told you they’d paid your taxes?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Rubeo.

"Correct," she replied.

"So you thought everything was okay?" we asked.

"Yes," she said.

But it wasn’t according to the Trustee’s office.

"They told me they haven’t been paid and that there’s no record of them being paid by the mortgage company," Rubeo explained.

SWBC hadn’t paid her 2016 property taxes or her 2017 taxes either.

And then there was this bombshell. Rubeo got a call from a realtor who said he had clients who wanted to buy her house. She told him it wasn’t for sale. And that’s when she learned her home was about to be sold at the Metro Courthouse in one of those public auctions to to pay off what she owed.

And just days later, it was sold to the highest bidder.

"And there was no way for you to stop it?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Rubeo.

"They told me it was too late," she replied.

"And you did everything you were supposed to do and still you lost your house?" we continued.

"Correct," she said.

We talked with Charlie Cardwell, Metro’s longtime Trustee. His office collects the property taxes for Davidson County.

"Did it have to get to this point?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked him.

"It should not have," Cardwell answered.

Cardwell said SWBC sent the wrong account information with Rubeo’s tax payment in both 2016 and again the following year.

"So we automatically send it back to them and say, ‘Well, this must be the wrong account because this account has already been paid,’" Cardwell explained.

"So the mortgage company then, you would think, would investigate and try to figure out which account it belonged to?" we asked him.

"You would think," he said.

But Cardwell says there’s no indication SWBC ever did.

The company turned down repeated requests for an interview, but claimed in a phone call to Rubeo that they had no idea they’d sent the wrong account information or that her house was going to be sold.

But NewsChannel 5 Investigates obtained documents that show the Trustee’s office repeatedly notified SWBC about their error and a letter from the Metro Legal Department warned there was a lien on the property for unpaid taxes and it was about to be sold.

"It sounds like SWBC dropped the ball?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates said to Cardwell.

"Definitely!" he emphatically replied.

Rubeo fortunately is still in her home. After we contacted SWBC and started asking questions, the company finally stepped up and paid the back taxes, plus several thousand dollars more in court costs, penalties and interest to save the house just before the sale was finalized, much to Rubeo’s relief!

"I could have lost everything. Where would we have gone?" Rubeo wondered.

Charlie Cardwell told NewsChannel 5 Investigates he doesn’t want this happening to anyone else so from now on, any time someone’s property taxes are not paid on time, his office will contact the mortgage company immediately to find out if there’s been a mix-up and work to get it fixed.

Copyright 2017 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Print this article Back to Top

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Woman Nearly Loses Home After Mortgage Company Mix-Up

NASHVILLE, Tn. – If you’re like a lot of people, you pay your property taxes through your monthly mortgage payment. But a woman who trusted her mortgage company to pay her taxes very nearly lost her house.

That company is one of the biggest mortgage providers in Nashville, but it turns out, they didn’t do what they were supposed to.

For the last two years, Carla Rubeo has called a condo in Antioch her home. But she very nearly lost it through no fault of her own.

"And I want people to know that yes, this can happen to anybody," Rubeo told NewsChannel 5 Investigates.

Rubeo said it all started earlier this year when she got a letter from the Davidson County Trustee’s Office, informing her that her 2016 property taxes hadn’t been paid.

"I thought it was a hoax," she recalled.

After all, she’d paid some each month as part of her mortgage and her mortgage company, SWBC, was paying the tax bill at the end of each year.

Or so she thought.

"So you called your mortgage company and they told you they’d paid your taxes?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Rubeo.

"Correct," she replied.

"So you thought everything was okay?" we asked.

"Yes," she said.

But it wasn’t according to the Trustee’s office.

"They told me they haven’t been paid and that there’s no record of them being paid by the mortgage company," Rubeo explained.

SWBC hadn’t paid her 2016 property taxes or her 2017 taxes either.

And then there was this bombshell. Rubeo got a call from a realtor who said he had clients who wanted to buy her house. She told him it wasn’t for sale. And that’s when she learned her home was about to be sold at the Metro Courthouse in one of those public auctions to to pay off what she owed.

And just days later, it was sold to the highest bidder.

"And there was no way for you to stop it?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Rubeo.

"They told me it was too late," she replied.

"And you did everything you were supposed to do and still you lost your house?" we continued.

"Correct," she said.

We talked with Charlie Cardwell, Metro’s longtime Trustee. His office collects the property taxes for Davidson County.

"Did it have to get to this point?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked him.

"It should not have," Cardwell answered.

Cardwell said SWBC sent the wrong account information with Rubeo’s tax payment in both 2016 and again the following year.

"So we automatically send it back to them and say, ‘Well, this must be the wrong account because this account has already been paid,’" Cardwell explained.

"So the mortgage company then, you would think, would investigate and try to figure out which account it belonged to?" we asked him.

"You would think," he said.

But Cardwell says there’s no indication SWBC ever did.

The company turned down repeated requests for an interview, but claimed in a phone call to Rubeo that they had no idea they’d sent the wrong account information or that her house was going to be sold.

But NewsChannel 5 Investigates obtained documents that show the Trustee’s office repeatedly notified SWBC about their error and a letter from the Metro Legal Department warned there was a lien on the property for unpaid taxes and it was about to be sold.

"It sounds like SWBC dropped the ball?" NewsChannel 5 Investigates said to Cardwell.

"Definitely!" he emphatically replied.

Rubeo fortunately is still in her home. After we contacted SWBC and started asking questions, the company finally stepped up and paid the back taxes, plus several thousand dollars more in court costs, penalties and interest to save the house just before the sale was finalized, much to Rubeo’s relief!

"I could have lost everything. Where would we have gone?" Rubeo wondered.

Charlie Cardwell told NewsChannel 5 Investigates he doesn’t want this happening to anyone else so from now on, any time someone’s property taxes are not paid on time, his office will contact the mortgage company immediately to find out if there’s been a mix-up and work to get it fixed.

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